Love Slyland


Hopefully we have all heard of the show Love Island, and if not then go fix yourself. The concept is five single men and five single women are paired up as couples and live in a villa together. Except one more man is introduced and the couples end up being voted off by the public and constantly switching around. The aim of the contestants is to find true love.....and win £50k, but true love is priceless. Now my question is what really is the psychology that makes the world obsessed with the show. I think there are potentially two main factors which really affect and draw people to the show. People love to romanticise about romance. There is this constant desire to find the one in society and truly have the perfect life. Love island to some extent shows the raw uncut truth about trying to find someone that right and even when you do how difficult and confusing it is. The drama and confusion yet somehow it all ending up working out fine. This comforts us, believing that we will be okay and even if it's not okay now it will work out okay. People really desire that emotional connection and being able to observe drama without being involved with it.  This links into my second point where we can really see how interested and dedicated people are in other people's drama and issues. We love to watch drama unravel from a 3rd person perspective but not get our hands dirty ourselves. And this is the perfect scenario in which we can quietly observe. I'm not going to sugar coat it and say that the people on the show are at all smart because frankly they are not. But, to some extent, I feel like this draws us into wanting to watch it almost as a psychological experiment and just muse over the interactions of them. I do believe in some way we are almost sub-consciously mocking them without even realising it. This isn't necessarily a bad thing but just they way we are programmed to feel like we are superior and better than others and we revel in seeing these people. Anyways, enjoy the show and just lets see who wins. P.S. Eyal is a prick Yours lovingly, Jamie